Planning for the Future.

Written By: B.D. Butler - Aug• 12•15

FutureI just read a post online and it gave me the writing jolt.  For those of you that may not know, writing comes when it comes, and you have to strike while the iron is hot, as they say.  This post had resonance and is rattling around in my brain, “I’m planning on a trust for my birds, because I want to make sure they are taken care of”. Pretty powerful words, right?  I mean, we all love birds, and we want the best for them, right? We’ve looked into planning for our retirement, yet, how many of us have taken the proactive initiative to plan for their future? 

While typing this, I realized that we actually don’t have current and up to date wills. To be honest, there was a time in my life where I lived pretty “freely” and wasn’t much of a planner and just thought I would “figure it out”.  Of course I think that’s before you get to the certain mind-set, where you realize your mortality.  One of my favorite quotes for aging is “you spend the first 40 years trying to kill yourself, and the last 40 trying not to”.  Aging isn’t for the faint of heart and it isn’t something that is for the faint of heart.  Taking a step back and making sure that your birds have protection and there is a clear and concise plan of where you, as their owner, want them to go is so important.  You are the one that makes them breakfast every morning and cleans cages and knows all of their little habits and quirks, of course you should have a say in their final home.  

While helping a few birds here and there find their way, we have run into the story of “my mother/father died and I need to find a home for her birds”, and the first question I always ask, “was there a will,were there any final wishes or arrangements made?” and nine times out of ten the answer is, “no”.  

Personally I want to have a hand in where ALL of our animals go, and make sure they get the same quality of care they would receive in our home.  I think that would be the biggest peace of mind if you were ill and could no longer care for your pets.  Knowing they will be taken care of down to the smallest detail, would definitely give me peace of mind.  trusts

There are ways to start planning:

1trust 

noun \ˈtrəst\

: an arrangement in which someone’s property or money is legally held or managed by someone else or by an organization (such as a bank) for usually a set period of time

Trusts are set up to hold money and a trustee will make payments to the sanctuary or home of your choice.will  

1Will

noun

A will is the legal instrument that permits a person, the testator, to make decisions on how his estate will be managed and distributed after his death.

There are now a lot of options for a will if you cannot afford an attorney to draw one up for you.  However I have seen some do their own wills and I would recommend you get a professional to help, if you can.  

pet_collagePreparation is important, because in the end, our animals won’t have the voices that we want them to.  They won’t be able to speak up and say where they want to go.  So, do them a favor and do some prep work.  Think about if you weren’t around, where you would want them to go or who you would want them to be with.  Many think parrots are going to be a burden and they look for the nearest sanctuary.  However that is not always the case, you may have struck a chord with a relative that would love to take your flock in, or maybe a neighbor that helps house sit or a friend from work that comes over for happy hour?  There are so many options, get creative and ask around.  

Because you never know what can happen when you’re Planning for the Future and trust me, they will thank you for it.

copyright – 2015 – Parrot Earth – Planning for the Future

 

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One Comment

  1. Brett Schug says:

    Thank you for writing this article. About a third of the parrots relinquished to us at Miss Vicki’s Parrot Village arrive because of longevity issues. Some outlived their previous owner and were willed to a friend or family member who decided parrot caretaking was not their desire, though they might have agreed to do so prior to their loved one’s death.
    Make a plan, discuss the plan, ensure the plan will take effect if you die suddenly. And make a backup plan too. We owe it to our cherished companion parrots.

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